Andrea Guarneri F-holes

The importance of well-placed F-holes… Every player has seen the instrument where the top is heavily damaged where the bridge is placed. Worn down from years of players moving the bridge back and forth over and over again.

This is why I take so much time making sure my F-holes are laid out properly to insure that the stop length for the bridge is precisely where I want it to be to produce the best potential sound.

Now this is not easily done because you need to insure that you took all of the necessary steps in the construction process. The arching is key to well-placed F-holes. If the arching isn’t shaped consistently on each side of the instrument it will appear as if the F-holes were not properly laid out. I take plenty of time making sure my arching has a mirror effect, meaning that both sides of the instrument are carved the same way so they mimic one another.

Then when I start to do my necessary measurements for F-hole placement, the F-holes lay on without trouble!

That is only half the battle, carving the F-holes with sharp tools is the real challenge!

 

Old German Violin

Violins are all the same, right? From the outside world I can see why all violins look the same!

But when you are a maker or a player you appreciate the beauty that instruments have to offer! This instrument wasn’t worth a terrible amount, it was a German violin made back in the late 1800’s and belonged to a good client of mine whose Grandfather use to play it in bars in Germany!

We decided to go ahead and repair the ‘wing’ of the f-hole. It wasn’t a very labor-intensive job, but it had its difficulties. Wood selection is one of the hardest things to do, how am I suppose to make a piece a spruce look 200 years old?

Then on top of that match 200-year-old varnish with the normal wear and tear… I found a piece of old spruce and was able to repair the damaged f-hole.

Another violin was saved and I am happy to say that the great-granddaughter is now enjoying the violin that lived a long life in Germany making it’s way to the USA!

 

Andrea Guarneri Viola

My latest viola build is a copy of one of the most known members of the Guarneri family; Andrea Guarneri. Andrea along with several other great makers apprenticed directly with the great Nicolo Amati.

Among those that apprenticed with Amati Guarneri held true to the Amati tradition. Andrea adopted his maters model so masterfully that some of this works are indistinguishable from his teacher’s. In general Guarneri’s work is somewhat freer and less exact then his master’s, but are nonetheless of a fantastic build. His smaller violas are regarded as some of the best-known violas left in existence today.

There are only 8 surviving examples still around today!

Andrea Guarneri shared his making knowledge with his two sons who assisted him from 1690 on. His sons went on to have their own celebrated careers; they were Giuseppe ‘filius Andrea’ and Pietro of Mantua.

I am loving this latest viola build. I haven’t made a Guarneri viola since my schooling at NBSS.

The viola is slightly larger than 16″ and puts out a huge sound!

Andrea Guarneri Viola Andrea Guarneri Viola Andrea Guarneri Viola Andrea Guarneri Viola Andrea Guarneri Viola Andrea Guarneri Viola

G. B. Guadagnini Cello

Giovanni Battista Guadagnini is one of my favorite makers! Guadagnini is regarded as the greatest maker of the second half of the 18th Century! Not one of the greatest, but thee greatest… His career expanded of 44 years and his original style produced some of the best sounding instruments in history!

Guadagnini lived an interesting life and unlike most makers he moved from city to city quite a bit throughout his violin-making career.

He finally ended up in Turin in 1771, where he met the well-known Count Cozio who later became a patron of his work. Cozio was responsible for the commission of some of Guadagnini’s finest works. In 1774 Cozio gained control of the remaining articles of the Stradivari workshop from Stradivari’s grandson, Paolo.

This allowed Guadagnini the opportunity to acquaint himself with the great Stradivari’s work first hand. After this time he adopted Stradivari’s models, using them more frequently. What a lucky guy!

This is my latest Guadagnini copy, which is a 7/8 cello! As a modern maker we are spoiled with great articles and books about old masters. I love taking the time to study fine instruments to see the details that the maker left behind!

G. B. Guadagnini Cello G. B. Guadagnini Cello G. B. Guadagnini Cello

Francois Nicolas Voirin Bow

F.N. Voirin- Bow maker: 1833-1885 was the cousin of Jean baptiste Vuillaume and his work in the Vuillaume workshop gave him access to most distinguished bow makers of the Peccatte school. But Voirin was largely inspired by the work of Pierre Simon and Vuillaume himself.

Most of the bows coming out of the Vuillaume workshop of the perior, which features an eye with a tiny lens microfilm are by Voirin.

Voirin later left the Vuillaume firm setting up his own workshop where he hired Louis Thomassin to assist him and Joseph Lamy later joined the shop. Both worked along side him until his death in 1885. Voirins bows are among the best and most important in the history of the trade!

I am happy to own one of his bows!!

 Francois Nicolas Voirin Bow  Francois Nicolas Voirin Bow

Huckins Violin- Sold

My latest commission build was for a very talented artist out of Denver, CO. Shawn Huckins is a modern day Michelangelo if I may say so myself! His paintings are works of art and I am so happy I could build him a violin.

We chose a Guadagnini copy because Shawn loves a deeper red varnish. We also antiqued the violin making its appearance to be much older then it is.

It turned out to be one of my favorite builds so far in my career. I delivered the violin in person to Colorado and we had a great time talking art and violin making! This was truly an experience of a lifetime for me getting to work with such an artist and build him a violin!

Do yourself a favor and go check out his fine art! It is incredible!

Huckins Violin- Sold Huckins Violin- Sold Huckins Violin- Sold Huckins Violin- Sold Huckins Violin- Sold Huckins Violin- Sold Huckins Violin- Sold Huckins Violin- Sold Huckins Violin- Sold Huckins Violin- Sold

Hermann Bachle Cello- 1976

A fine cello, handmade by Hermann Bachle, also spelled Baechle. Although it is almost 40 years old, this cello is in near mint condition. It was purchased in 1977 at the Meisel Violin shop in Owatonna, Minnesota and was rarely used by its owner who was an instrument collector.

The cello is modeled from Guarnerius Del Gesu. The back is two-piece European maple with medium curls and is a very clean, beautiful back. The top is European spruce and has a very straight grain with quite a few bear claw markings.

The scroll is beautifully carved in the Guarnerius tradition matching in material and structure on the back. The instrument is stamped with the makers mark on both the inside and back of the instrument near the button. With all that said, it is overall a very fine cello, especially considering its age. I have in my possession the original sales slip and appraisal dating back to November 19th, 1977.

Bachle has won many awards for his sound and craftsmanship.

Hermann Bachle Cello- 1976 Hermann Bachle Cello- 1976 Hermann Bachle Cello- 1976 Hermann Bachle Cello- 1976 Hermann Bachle Cello- 1976

Hermann Todt 1929

Hermann Todt made this violin specifically for William Lewis & Son of Chicago in 1929. Todt was a violin maker from Markneukirchen. This violin was made with exceptional wood for the maker. The top spruce is very even with tight grain, while the maple has a deep medium width flame.

It is branded on both the back plate near the button. And on the inside of the back plate above the William Lewis & Son label.

The William Lewis & Son was a Chicago based music store that specialized in violins and bows. William E. Lewis the founder, was the son of a cellist and he became a violinist. At the age of 8 English critics elected him as a musical prodigy. The family moved to America in 1850.

The William Lewis & Son firm was established in 1874 and lasted 80 long years building a nice collection of instruments including Stradivarius, Guarneri, Montagnana, Storioni, Rugeri, Guadagnini and many more fine instruments made by old masters.

Hermann Todt 1929 Hermann Todt 1929 Hermann Todt 1929 Hermann Todt 1929

7/8 Cello Progress

Cello progress! Finally! I never get to build instruments as much as my heart desires but I do love taking the time to bring old instruments back to life so someone can enjoy playing them again. So I guess the trade off isn’t so bad…

But back to the progress on the cello, I am working on the final graduations before gluing the back onto the rib structure and fit a bass bar. The scroll is just about finished except for some light scraping. I am anxious to see how this petite, little cello ends up sounding!

It is in the final weeks of the instrument build process that you see the instrument really come together. So the next steps are to glue the back onto the ribs, fit the bass bar and shape it, then glue the top on to complete the sound box!

Then I will carve a fingerboard and set the neck before the cello spends a few weeks sun tanning before I can start the varnish process!

Check back for a finished product in a few more weeks.

7/8 Cello Progress 7/8 Cello Progress 7/8 Cello Progress 7/8 Cello Progress

Small Violin Repair

Small repairs can be as tedious as large restorations. The trouble is finding the perfect piece of wood to match the original 100-year-old violin top.

Luckily when I removed the top to start the repair I found the old bass bar was carved into the top rather then fit to the top the proper way. This allowed me to split the old bass bar out, and use the piece of spruce that was original to the top! A perfect match, so the hard part is done, right? Next I was able to fit the spruce onto the edge at the broken corner leaving plenty of extra so I could match the corner to the outline of the instrument.

I will spend the next few weeks varnishing the corner to match the original varnish. Then I can fit a new bass bar before closing the top and doing the final set up.

This instrument should sound great with a well fit bass bar and proper set up!

It will also look pretty having all of its corners back!

Small Violin Repair Small Violin Repair Small Violin Repair